How to Take Care of Your Hairless Kitten, Health, And Care Tips

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After long thought and dozens of researches, you made your decision and finally adopted your little hairless kitten. Right decision! As you get to know these unique-looking cats, you won't believe how you lived without them for so long. Now let's learn how to take care of these delicate kittens.

Take care of your Hairless Kitten in the right way

If there's one thing you need to know before bringing a hairless kitten home, it's that being hairless doesn't mean less grooming is required. In reality, it will need a lot of interviews. Cats' fur absorbs and separates oily secretions, and without it, your kitten's skin can become oily, dirty, and even smelly. Sphynxes need regular bathing, regular ear cleaning, and nail trimming to stay in their best shape. And beware: this hairless cat is just as susceptible to fleas as its furry counterparts, so you'll need to take the usual flea and parasite precautions.

Cat owners should ask their veterinarian what type of soap or shampoo to use for a Sphynx. It is advisable to avoid the use of products that are too drying.

Sphynxes are naturally active animals, so you won't have to go out of your way to get them moving. As long as you provide them with plenty of cat toys to keep them occupied and suitable cat furniture, you can expect them to have the same schedule as almost any other cat – long hours of sleep in their cat house with bouts of high energy for running around, jumping, and playing on their cat towers.

hairless kitten

This intelligent and curious hairless kitten gets used to training quickly and love to learn.

Social butterflies, Sphynxes get along with almost any member of the family, whether four-legged or two-legged. Their attention-seeking tendencies and insatiable curiosity can get them into trouble, though: keep an eye on your Sphynx to make sure he doesn't wander off to explore the neighborhood. As with any cat, he should never go out unsupervised.

Sphynx cats have a big appetite to match their big bellies and need more food than most cats. Watch their weight, but don't worry about their rounded chest which is a perfectly healthy characteristic of this breed. Consult your veterinarian about when what food, and how often to feed your Sphynx.

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Health and Care Tips

 Sphynx cats are generally healthy cats with a life expectancy of 8 to 14 years. But, like all breeds, they are subject to certain feline diseases such as coryza, typhus, leucosis, or chlamydiosis.

 Common health issues diagnosed in the Sphynx include dental disease, skin issues such as greasy or oily skin, and heart problems. HCM, or feline hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, is the most common heart disease in cats and Sphynxes can get it. It is an inherited disease that causes the thickening of the walls of the heart. Unfortunately, the disease is incurable and has a very variable course depending on the cat. Indeed, some cats die within a few weeks or months, while others have an almost normal life expectancy.

hairless kitten

When adopting a hairless kitten, you should also be wary of a condition called hereditary myopathy. This disease causes muscle weakness that can make the cat unable to exercise or even walk normally.

  Reputable Sphynx breeders screen your kitten for health issues. It's important to remember vet appointments and screenings – hereditary myopathy and other health issues can go unnoticed until late in your cat's life.

Is the Sphynx a hypoallergenic cat?

The Sphynx is a hairless cat and has a reputation for being a hypoallergenic cat. Before answering the question, let's see why cats trigger allergic reactions in some people.

The allergy of cats irritates the mucous membranes and this phenomenon is often associated with the animal's hair. In reality, the allergy is not caused by the hair, but by the saliva. Indeed, by licking the cat deposits all over its body the proteins FEL D1 and FEL D4. All breeds of cats secrete these two proteins, in greater or lesser quantities. However, cat breeds do not have the same allergenic potential.

There are two types of hypoallergenic cats: the first type is cats that secrete little FEL D1 and FEL D4 and the second consists of cats that shed very little hair.

One of the most hypoallergenic cats in the world is the Siberian, which has abundant fur but secretes little protein.

 hairless kitten

The Sphynx is one of the cats that sheds very little hair and therefore obviously belongs to the second type of hypoallergenic cat.

The FEL D1 and FEL D4 proteins are also found in the urine of cats. People with allergies must therefore take care to keep their pet's litter perfectly clean, even if it is a hypoallergenic cat.

 Sterilization reduces the production of FEL D1 and FEL D4 proteins in cats. If you are allergic, it is therefore particularly recommended to sterilize your feline.

 No breed of cat is completely hypoallergenic. If you are very sensitive, only an appropriate treatment or desensitization can help you live better with your favorite pet!

The pampered traits of the hairless kitten are not unique to the breed. All cats have wrinkles, but you can't see them under all that fur! 

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